Yes, the New York Times. Tyler Kepner takes a deep look into the Rockies’ hot start by going straight to the source: the players. He gets some fantastic quotes and perspectives from just about half the clubhouse. If you read one thing from this Rockpile, this is the one.

In case you haven’t noticed, Charlie Blackmon is having a pretty good year for the Rockies. He’s already more than a third of the way to his 2016 home run total a little more than a quarter of the way into the season. He’s hitting .325/.361/.618, good for a .407 wOBA, third best among NL outfielders (a group that includes Bryce Harper). Oh, and he’s doing it all from the leadoff spot. If Charlie isn’t starting the All-Star Game, it will be because not enough Rockies fans voted for him (hint hint).

Patrick Saunders spoke with Bud Black about some of the best problems a manager can have: too many good players to fit into one lineup. When Ian Desmond missed the first month of the season, it was pretty straightforward, and it stayed so when Story hit the DL. Now with Alexi Amarista and Pat Valaika hitting well from the shortstop position, and Reynolds still hitting (despite not getting many starts over the past week), what’s a manager to do? Oh, and David Dahl and Tom Murphy still haven’t played an inning in 2017 too, just as a reminder.

In case you might be under the impression that the Rockies are a big flash in the pan, just know that the farm system is set to continue producing talent. Case in point: Brendan Rodgers, who has “cooled off” down to a .352/.374/.602 line. The author seems to think the Rockies would jump him from High-A to the majors at some point this season, which would not only be a big break from the Rockies’ modus operandi, but would probably rush his development a little much. Of course, if he keeps hitting like this, there’s no telling how soon we’ll see him in purple pinstripes.

Sure, let’s talk more about Charlie Blackmon! Kevin Henry flashes back to a time when Chuck Nazty seemed to be the most likely candidate for a trade. Where would the Rockies be had just one of those rumors come to fruition?

In a recent FanPost, user ColoradoMania! describes why following a good Rockies team is so important and so meaningful for those fans who have stuck with them through some fallow years.

Who is more likely to make the playoffs: the Diamondbacks or the Rockies? If you take a dive into some of the numbers you might think, as Devan Fink concludes, that the D-backs are in better position. I could make a lot of purple-tinted glasses arguments against these numbers, but one point Fink brings up himself I think he glosses over far too quickly:

The gap could close, however, if DJ LeMahieu (86 wRC+) and Ian Desmond (63 wRC+) get hot and begin to produce at 2016 levels. Carlos Gonzalez (59 wRC+) and Trevor Story (65 wRC+ and freshly off the DL) also remain as question marks. The fact that the Rockies are 30-17 with those four players hitting below the league average is commendable, though.

The Diamondbacks offense has been great and the Rockies’ has been bad. But which is more likely to continue?

Owner problems remind us that, since Jeff Bridich took over, we haven’t heard much from the Monfort Brothers.

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